Q: Is MacBook Pro worth buying in 2018?

A: First, although my career has been dominated by Mac, my organization also supports Chrome, Linux, and Windows. This is to say I don’t have a dog in this race.

COST

People that point out that Mac’s are significantly more expensive than PC’s are comparing (literally) Apples to oranges. Comparing a BMW to a Yugo. There aren’t any low-end Macs to compare a $300 Costco special to. However, if you compare a high-end PC to a comparably-equipped Mac, they are nose to nose, with the Mac often a bit lower priced.

Then we need to calculate the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). There is a reason that IBM - the folks who invented the PC - has migrated to macOS. TCO. It takes a small fraction of the tech support to handle their Macs compared to the previous PC’s. US General Accounting Office says the same thing - that Macs are up to 1/3 the cost in TCO.

EASE OF USE

This may well be a tie. Most folks can navigate and use macOS applications as easily as Windows applications. They are often clones of each other.

QUALITY OF APPLICATIONS

Again, this is a tie if considering industry-standard apps. Office is the same train wreck on macOS as it is on Windows. Adobe products are about the same quality on each.

At the non-industry-standard apps you start to see a difference. Generally speaking (yes I know there are many exceptions), the little-known apps on macOS are far more stable, use less resources than the equivalent on Windows.

SECURITY

This is a no-brainer. Right out of the box macOS has won the race. To fully harden a Mac is significantly easier than same on Windows. I used to attend monthly FBI Cybersecurity meetings. The FBI presenter would use a MacBook Pro to run Powerpoint. He once got heckled by some bank CIO about “when was he going to get a real computer”. The FBI guy shot back “you mean a PC? Naw, we don’t like getting hacked”.

ENTERPRISE COMPATIBILITY

If we are talking a large organization, Windows has a bit of an edge. Active Directory is baked in, and with an AD server, you can have some very fine-grained control over your Windows devices. Mac doesn’t come close. Doesn’t help any that macOS Server is DOA.

That said, you can still have fine-grained control over your Macs (and Windows) systems using Mobile Device Management.

Me, I get to choose whatever I want to use (Mel Brooks said it best: “It’s good to be king”. I get free tech support, and the company pays for my IT toys. I choose Mac because, well, I’m 62 years old. I don’t have time to  wrestle with the silly Windows problems. My Windows specialists typically feel the same.

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